Start Submission Become a Reviewer

Reading: Tobacco, Alcohol, and Cancer in Low and High Income Countries

Download

A- A+
Alt. Display

State of the Art Review

Tobacco, Alcohol, and Cancer in Low and High Income Countries

Authors:

Yuan-Chin Amy Lee ,

Division of Public Health, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
About Yuan-Chin
PhD
X close

Mia Hashibe

Division of Public Health, Department of Family & Preventive Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT
About Mia
PhD
X close

Abstract

Background

Tobacco use is a well-established risk factor for cancers of the lung, head and neck, nasopharynxesophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, kidney, bladder, leukemia, and cervixAlcohol consumption is a well-established risk factor for cancers of the head and neck, esophagus, liver, colorectum, and breast for women only. The majority of studies on tobacco and alcohol were conducted in high-income countries (HICs).

Objective

The aim of this review was to assess the extent of tobacco and alcohol usage and to compare the cancer burden between low- and high-income regions.

Findings

Overall, tobacco smoking is estimated to account for 21% of cancer deaths worldwide (29% in HICs and 18% in low- and middle-income countries [LMICs]). Alcohol consumption is estimated to account for 5% of all cancer deaths worldwide, with similar proportions in LMICs. Cancers of the breast, lung, stomach, liver, head and neck, esophagus, cervix, and nasopharynx, and leukemia are already diagnosed in greater numbers each year in less-developed countries compared with more developed countries. The future burden of tobacco- and alcohol-related cancers on less-developed regions is expected to increase greatly based on demographic effects, with a 69.9% increase in tobacco-related cancer cases and a 68% increase in cancers related to alcohol. Although HICs have experienced a decrease in tobacco prevalence in recent decades, LMICs are still in the early stages of the tobacco epidemic.

Conclusion

Tobacco use and alcohol consumption will clearly remain important risk factors that must be targeted with public health efforts particularly in LMICs.

How to Cite: Amy Lee, Y.-C. and Hashibe, M., 2014. Tobacco, Alcohol, and Cancer in Low and High Income Countries. Annals of Global Health, 80(5), pp.378–383. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.aogh.2014.09.010
27
Views
14
Downloads
18
Citations
Published on 13 Dec 2014.
Peer Reviewed

Downloads

  • PDF (EN)

    comments powered by Disqus