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Reading: Environmental Heat Stress Among Young Working Women: A Pilot Study

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Original Research

Environmental Heat Stress Among Young Working Women: A Pilot Study

Authors:

Juma Rahman ,

Department of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
About Juma
MBBS, MPH
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S.H.M. Fakhruddin,

Tonkin and Taylor, Auckland, New Zealand
About S.H.M.
PhD
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A.K.M. Fazlur Rahman,

Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Department of Epidemiology, Bangladesh University of Health Sciences, Mirpur, Dhaka, Bangladesh
About A.K.M. Fazlur
PhD
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M.A. Halim

Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh; Obstetrics and Gynecological Society of Bangladesh (OGSB) Hospital & Institute of Reproductive & Child Health, Dhaka, Bangladesh
About M.A.
PhD
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Abstract

Background

Heat waves are increasing significantly in frequency and severity and threaten the health and income of outdoor workers. Pregnant women workers are particularly at risk due to their delicate physiological systems and accountabilities to future generations. Animal and human studies propose that elevated body temperatures during pregnancy can induce adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Objective

To measure the change in internal body temperature (Tcore) in young working women before, after, and during work (both outdoor and indoor) on hot humid days and relate threshold temperature to the upshot adverse effects of pregnancy (teratogenicity and related miscarriage).

Methods

Tympanic temperatures were measured using infrared ear thermometers and workplace temperatures were collected using Lascar Data Logger. Brief exploratory interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data, and content analysis was also carried out.

Findings

Body temperatures were found elevated among outdoor women workers compared with that of indoor women workers.

Conclusions

The present study found that outdoor work during pregnancy in hot, humid days might increase body temperature up to levels that could induce fetal destruction or anomaly.
How to Cite: Rahman, J., Fakhruddin, S.H.M., Rahman, A.K.M.F. and Halim, M.A., 2017. Environmental Heat Stress Among Young Working Women: A Pilot Study. Annals of Global Health, 82(5), pp.760–767. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.aogh.2016.07.007
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Published on 08 Mar 2017.
Peer Reviewed

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