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Original Research

Peer-Reviewed Veterinary Journals From Arabic-Speaking Countries: A Systematic Review

Authors:

Kristen M. Robertson ,

Department of Public Health, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL
About Kristen M.
DVM, MPH
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Jacquelyn E. Bowser,

Department of Equine Studies, Johnson & Wales University, Providence, RI
About Jacquelyn E.
DVM, PhD, DACVIM-LA
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Joshua Bernstein,

A.T. Still University of Health Sciences, College of Graduate Health Studies, Kirksville, MO
About Joshua
PhD, CHES
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Basil H. Aboul-Enein

Department of Global Health & Development, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK
About Basil H.
MSc, MPH, MA, EdD, FRSPH
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Abstract

Background

The prevalence of diseases of foodborne and zoonotic origin in Arabic-speaking countries highlights the importance of collaboration between human and animal health professionals. However, accessibility of research and evidence-based practices in these countries is not well characterized. This brief report determines the availability of professional veterinary journals within the Arabic-speaking region.

Methods

An electronic search using 6 databases assessed for publication period, activity status, and available languages incorporated all aspects of veterinary medicine and specialties.

Results

Among 29 veterinary journals identified, the oldest current publication originated 63 years ago, with 10 journals currently interrupted or ceased. All 19 currently active journals are available electronically as open access, with 8 also offered in paper format. Veterinary journals published within Arabic-speaking countries are predominantly produced in Egypt, Iraq, and Sudan.

Conclusion

Electronic access is lacking compared with English-speaking countries, and there is a lack of journals with an Arabic-language option. The reasons associated with language options in veterinary publications are not immediately apparent, yet may highlight differences among public health, health education, and zoonotic professionals and the populations they serve. Veterinary journals in Arabic-speaking countries do not adequately represent the overall region and are limited in access. Further evaluation of regional culture and publisher preferences is indicated to identify new collaboration opportunities among health professionals and local stakeholders.
How to Cite: Robertson, K.M. et al. , (2017). Peer-Reviewed Veterinary Journals From Arabic-Speaking Countries: A Systematic Review . Annals of Global Health . 83 ( 3-4 ) , pp . 524–529 . DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.aogh.2017.10.010
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Published on 10 Nov 2017.
Peer Reviewed

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